The CEO of JP Morgan Chase twice apologized to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for inappropriate remarks related to China: it is the right attitude


2021-11-25: [Article Link] (Observer Network News) "I feel regret." "It's not right to joke or slander any group, whether it's for a country, leadership, or any part of society and culture." JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon has twice apologized to China after making inappropriate remarks about China on 23 March. According to reports from the British "Guardian" and Reuters on November 25, JPMorgan Chase CEO Dimon said on the 24th that he regretted that his company would live longer than the Chinese Communist Party. In an official statement released by JPMorgan Chase, Dimon said: "I regret it and should not have made such remarks. I was trying to emphasize the strength and longevity of our company." A spokesman for JPMorgan Chase also said that Dimon understood that he "should never talk rashly or disrespectfully about another country or its leadership". "During the discussion, he made it clear that China and the Chinese are very smart and very thoughtful." Just the day before (23), Dimon said in a series of interviews at Boston College, "I made a joke the other day that the Chinese Communist Party is celebrating its 100th anniversary, and so is JPMorgan Chase. I bet we can last longer." "I can't talk like this in China. And they may be listening." According to people familiar with the matter, Dimon immediately realized that he had said the wrong thing. After seeing the reaction from the outside world, he decided to express regret. In a later statement, he added, "It is wrong to joke or slander any group, whether it is to a country, its leadership, or any part of society and culture. That way of speaking may affect the constructive and thinking dialogue in society, which is needed more than ever." Reuters commented that Dimon moved quickly to avoid any long-term effects. August this year, regulatory approval in China J.P. Morgan Securities (China) (spoke in Chinese) become China's first foreign wholly owned securities company is in the opening of China's financial markets represented a milestone. On November 24, Bloomberg mentioned Dimon's initial improper remarks at a regular press conference of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and asked the Chinese side for comments. Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian asked: Is Bloomberg a "serious media? If you have this kind of eyeball, you should also use it to brush the sense of existence? On the 25th, Zhao Lijian responded again, saying that I also noticed the relevant reports and noticed that the relevant people expressed sincere reflection. I think this is a correct attitude. We hope that the relevant media will not use the topic to play and hype.


Note: This is a translated version of the Chinese news media article. A mature and nuanced reading is suggested.







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The CEO of JP Morgan Chase twice apologized to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for inappropriate remarks related to China: it is the right attitude


2021-11-25: [Article Link] (Observer Network News) "I feel regret." "It's not right to joke or slander any group, whether it's for a country, leadership, or any part of society and culture." JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon has twice apologized to China after making inappropriate remarks about China on 23 March. According to reports from the British "Guardian" and Reuters on November 25, JPMorgan Chase CEO Dimon said on the 24th that he regretted that his company would live longer than the Chinese Communist Party. In an official statement released by JPMorgan Chase, Dimon said: "I regret it and should not have made such remarks. I was trying to emphasize the strength and longevity of our company." A spokesman for JPMorgan Chase also said that Dimon understood that he "should never talk rashly or disrespectfully about another country or its leadership". "During the discussion, he made it clear that China and the Chinese are very smart and very thoughtful." Just the day before (23), Dimon said in a series of interviews at Boston College, "I made a joke the other day that the Chinese Communist Party is celebrating its 100th anniversary, and so is JPMorgan Chase. I bet we can last longer." "I can't talk like this in China. And they may be listening." According to people familiar with the matter, Dimon immediately realized that he had said the wrong thing. After seeing the reaction from the outside world, he decided to express regret. In a later statement, he added, "It is wrong to joke or slander any group, whether it is to a country, its leadership, or any part of society and culture. That way of speaking may affect the constructive and thinking dialogue in society, which is needed more than ever." Reuters commented that Dimon moved quickly to avoid any long-term effects. August this year, regulatory approval in China J.P. Morgan Securities (China) (spoke in Chinese) become China's first foreign wholly owned securities company is in the opening of China's financial markets represented a milestone. On November 24, Bloomberg mentioned Dimon's initial improper remarks at a regular press conference of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and asked the Chinese side for comments. Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian asked: Is Bloomberg a "serious media? If you have this kind of eyeball, you should also use it to brush the sense of existence? On the 25th, Zhao Lijian responded again, saying that I also noticed the relevant reports and noticed that the relevant people expressed sincere reflection. I think this is a correct attitude. We hope that the relevant media will not use the topic to play and hype.


Note: This is a translated version of the Chinese news media article. A mature and nuanced reading is suggested.